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Moving to Connecticut

There are a lot of reasons why people move to a new place. Some people move in hopes of getting a fresh start somewhere new. Sometimes, we have to move due to a new job opportunity. Or maybe we want to be closer to your family or a loved one. Whatever the reason, moving is a big deal and it takes quite a lot of planning.

Aerial view of Downtown Hartford, Connecticut
Hartford is the capital of Connecticut, and is the home to the oldest continually published newspaper in America

Connecticut is one of the most widely-known states in the New England region. Geographically speaking, it is located in one of the most privileged parts of the United States as it is a neighbor to New York City and Boston, which are two of the most important locations in this region.

With a population of a little over 3,5 million people, Connecticut has a lot to offer in terms of education and life quality. In 2010, the Constitution State, as it is known, had both the highest income per capita and the highest HDI in the United States, making it one of the best places to live in America.

Contents:

Pros and Cons

Just like every other state, moving to Connecticut has its pros and cons. Before you make the final decision of moving (or not), you have to take into consideration every aspect of living in the Constitution State. We’re here to help you with that decision! Here are the pros and cons of moving to Connecticut!

Pros

  1. Easy access to major cities. Living in Connecticut means you’ll have easy access to two major cities: New York and Boston. All you have to do is hop on a train and you’ll be in either city within just a couple of hours.
  2. Small-town experience. If you’re all about that small-town life but also enjoy being a city person, you’ll love Connecticut and it’s picturesque towns.
  3. Great school system. The Constitution State is home to one of the best universities in the world (Yale) and it ranks among the top 12 American states in terms of quality education.
  4. A safe place. Out of all fifty states, Connecticut ranks #7 when it comes to crime and corrections, meaning that it’s one of the safest places to live in America.
  5. Higher salaries. In comparison to other states, Connecticut residents earn higher salaries than their peers from out of state.
  6. All four seasons. If you’re looking forward to experiencing fall, summer, spring, and winter, you’ll love the weather in Connecticut.
  7. Outdoor living. When the weekend comes around, all we want to do is enjoy ourselves. If you like going outdoors, Connecticut has some pretty amazing sights you can visit.

Cons

  1. Higher taxes. The Constitution State has one of the highest taxes in the United States, mostly because its economy relies heavily on taxes.
  2. Nightlife. If you like partying on the weekends, keep in mind that Connecticut doesn’t offer much in terms of nightlife. But you can easily go to New York for some nightly fun.
  3. High cost-of-living. Similar to other New England states, the cost of living in Connecticut is considerably higher than in other states.
  4. Employment rates. Unfortunately, the employment rates in Connecticut are decreasing. The Constitution State ranks #30 out of 50 in terms of employment.
  5. Cold winter. Wintertime in Connecticut can be pretty brutal, with some parts of the state experiencing snowfall that lasts for almost two weeks at a time!
  6. Expensive homes. Living in Connecticut is expensive, and so are the houses. Not to mention that property taxes in this state, which are the fourth-highest in the U.S.
  7. Insane traffic. Given its location among major cities, the traffic in Connecticut can be pretty hectic. Statistics show that the Constitution State has some of the worst highways in the country.

Fun Facts

Front view of the State Capitol building at the Bushnell Park, Hartford, Connecticut
Bushnell Park was conceived in the mid-1800s and was received with skepticism by the population because it was publicly funded — in fact, it was the very first publicly-funded park in the States

Connecticut, which was the fifth state to join the United States back in 1788, is a land of interesting facts and inventions, in spite of its small size (it is the third-smallest state in the country). Below we’re going to show you 6 fun facts about the Constitution State!

  • Inventions land: The frisbee, the vacuum cleaner, and the can opener are among the several things which were invented in Connecticut or by a Connecticut native!
  • License plates: Back in 1937, the Constitution State began issuing permanent license plates for cars, making it the first American state to do that.
  • Celebrities: Some of the famous people born in Connecticut include: former president George W. Bush, singer/songwriter John Mayer, and ‘Twilight’ author Stephanie Meyer.
  • Origins of the name: The name ‘Connecticut’ means ‘long tidal river’ in Native American dialects.
  • A land of arms: Samuel Colt, the man who invented the revolver, was born in Connecticut, and this land was once a leader in gun manufacturing.
  • Constitution State: Connecticut’s official nickname is ‘Constitution State’ because its Fundamental Orders (circa 1639) were used as a model for the first American constitution.

Funny Laws

It’s safe to say that, basically, every state has its weird and funny laws. Although it’s hard to pinpoint the exact reasons why these laws were created, they exist anyway. Here are 5 funny laws in the state of Connecticut!

  • Crossing the streets: If you’re moving to Connecticut, keep in mind that it’s against the law to cross the streets on your hands in Hartford!
  • Shush, dude: In Waterbury, beauticians are forbidden by law to hum, whistle, or sing while working on a client’s hair and/or beard.
  • Walk straightforward: If you’re in Devon, Connecticut, do not walk backward after the sun is set, or else you’ll be in trouble with the law.
  • No dog schools: In the capital of the Constitution State, Hartford, the law strictly forbids humans from educating dogs.
  • Speed limit for bikes: In the State of Connecticut, people riding bicycles are forbidden by law to go over 65 mph on their bikes — as if anyone can reach that speed!

Weather and Climate

In the northern part of Connecticut, the climate is classified as humid continental, which means that it’s hot and humid during summer, and pretty snowy and cold during wintertime. As to the southern areas of the state, the climate is humid subtropical, meaning that it doesn’t get as cold as in the north during the winter. In Connecticut, it’s possible to experience all four seasons, including the colorful foliage during fall. From mid-May to mid-October, the temperature is mild and comfy (average 65 °F – 70 °F). But be ready to face cruel cold from December to February, as the temperature usually drops below O °F.

Nature

Aerial view of Downtown Hartford, Connecticut
Charles M. Pond was the owner of the estate where Elizabeth Park is located. He gave the estate to the city of Hartford under the condition that it be named after his deceased wife

Connecticut has a lot to offer when it comes to nature. There are beaches, lakes, mountains, rivers, and many other sights. If you’re the type of person who enjoys being outdoors, moving to Connecticut is the right choice! Here are 5 of the top places to see in the Constitution State:

  • Sleeping Giant State Park, Hamden;
  • Thimble Islands
  • Kent Falls State Park, Kent
  • Cathedral Pines, Cornwall
  • Ocean Beach Park, New London

Natural Disasters

Unfortunately, Connecticut is not safe from natural disasters and has experienced a fair share of disasters throughout its history. During the summer and late spring, thunderstorms are quite common. Tornadoes are also common during storm season. Below are some of the natural disasters that can occur in Connecticut:

  • Blizzards
    • Considering that the wintertime in Connecticut is brutal, blizzards occur quite a lot during this period when temperatures drop well below 0 °F.
  • Floods
    • Though not as common, Connecticut has experienced floods, especially during storm season.
  • Hurricanes
    • Connecticut is not directly struck by hurricanes, but it is affected when there hurricanes on the East Coast.

If you want to know more about natural disasters in Connecticut, check out the State Library’s list.

Moving Prices from Major Cities

If you’re moving to Connecticut from a major city, the whole process can be quite stressful and expensive — unless you do thorough research before you contact a moving company. Here are the estimated costs of moving to Connecticut from 6 major cities in the United States:

  • Miami, Florida to Connecticut: $3300 — $5500
  • Chicago, Illinois to Connecticut: $2631 — $4386
  • Waco, Texas to Connecticut: $3092 — $5153
  • Boston, Massachusetts to Connecticut: $1560 — $2601
  • Los Angeles, California to Connecticut: $5340 — $8901
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Connecticut: $2753 — $4588

You can get free moving estimates on our moving costs calculator.

Housing / Real Estate

As we mentioned previously, Connecticut is one of the most expensive places to live in the United States. If you’re moving to the Constitution State, be ready to disburse something like $300,000 for a single-family home and a little over $190,000 for a condo. Now, if you’re planning on renting, the average rent price in Hartford, Connecticut is around $1,200/month.

Price of Living

Before moving to Connecticut, you need to know just how much you’re going to spend annually (and monthly) while living there. The cost-of-living index (let’s shorten that to CoLI) compares the expenses from most towns/states in America. While the CoLI in the United States is 100 (in general), that number is up to 107 in Connecticut, meaning that it’s more expensive to live here than in other states. Below are the estimated living costs in different areas of Connecticut, for a 4-persons family:

Hartford County, CT

EXPENSES COST
Housing $1,142
Food $789
Child care $1,305
Transportation $1,188
Health care $1,024
Other necessities $779
Taxes $1,062
Monthly total $7,289
Annual total $87,464

New Haven County, CT

EXPENSES COST
Housing $1,244
Food $787
Child care $1,372
Transportation $1,207
Health care $1,125
Other necessities $819
Taxes $1,157
Monthly total $7,711
Annual total $92,532

New London County, CT

EXPENSES COST
Housing $1,199
Food $883
Child care $1,365
Transportation $1,280
Health care $1,096
Other necessities $840
Taxes $1,198
Monthly total $7,859
Annual total $94,312

Fairfield County, CT

EXPENSES COST
Housing $1,627
Food $883
Child care $1,579
Transportation $1,231
Health care $1,216
Other necessities $1,013
Taxes $1,575
Monthly total $9,125
Annual total $109,497

The data shown here were collected from the Economic Policy Institute’s Family Budget Calculator.

Demographics

The estimated population of the state of Connecticut was 3,565,287 million people in July 2019. Out of this number, 51.2% are female and 17.7% are 65 years and over. The largest ethnic group in the Constitution State are:

  • White (non-Hispanic): 66.3%
  • Black or African American (non-Hispanic): 10%
  • White (Hispanic): 8.97%
  • Other (Hispanic): 5.15%
  • Asian (non-Hispanic): 4.61%

Education

View of the statue “Lincoln Meets Stowe” in Hartford, Connecticut
The “Lincoln Meets Stowe” statue is located at Lincoln Financial Sculpture Walk at Riverfront in Hartford. The statue, which shows Lincoln meeting Hartford-native author Harriet Beecher Stowe, is one of 16 statues dedicated to Abraham Lincoln at Lincoln Financial

Connecticut ranks #12 in terms of education. This state is home to some of the most prestigious universities in the United States and is the fifth-best state for K-12 education. Below are a few of the top educational institutions (high schools and universities) in Connecticut:

High Schools

Universities / Colleges

Healthcare and Medical Institutions

Among all fifty states, Connecticut ranks #3 when it comes to healthcare. As to healthcare access, the Constitution State is the best in the country, mostly because of the many healthcare programs available. Public health is also above average in this state, making it one of the top 10 states for public health. Below are some of the top medical institutions in Connecticut:

  • Yale-New Haven Hospital
  • Hartford Hospital
  • St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center
  • Danbury Hospital
  • Bridgeport Hospital

The government of the state of Connecticut promotes many different healthcare and insurance programs for all residents of the state, which can all be accessed on the official state website.

Tourism / Attractions

Front porch of the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut
The Mark Twain House was the place where Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) wrote some of his most famous works, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

While Connecticut does not rely heavily on tourism for the economy, this section still generates around 4 billion dollars in revenue each year. There is a lot of open land in the Constitution State, and tourists will find beautiful beaches and amazing hills and mountains. Here are some tourists-favorite spots in Connecticut:

  • Mystic Seaport & Mystic Aquarium;
  • Nautilus Memorial;
  • Litchfield Hills;
  • Connecticut River Valley;
  • Branford Trolley Museum;
  • New-Gate Prison;
  • The Mark Twain Home;
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe;
  • Lake Compounce;
  • Gillette Castle;
  • Valley Railroad.

Top Cities

Connecticut’s cities may not be as hugely popular as New York City or Los Angeles, but they’re still incredible places in their own way. The cities in the Constitution State are picturesque and offer plenty of historic sights. Here are the top 5 cities in Connecticut:

  • New Haven
    • Home to the prestigious Yale University, New Haven is located on the northern shore of the Long Island Sound and it is the second-largest city in the state, with a population of over 130,000 people.
  • Bridgeport
    • The largest city in Connecticut, Bridgeport is a historic city and is located just 60 miles away from Manhattan. Fun fact: the Frisbee was created here.
  • Hartford
    • The capital of Connecticut, Hartford is home to the oldest art museum and the oldest published newspaper in America.
  • Greenwich
    • The largest town in Connecticut’s Gold Coast, Greenwich is one of the wealthiest towns in the United States. The average income per capita in Greenwich was $101,619 in 2019!
  • Stamford
    • The third-largest city in Connecticut, Stamford is the midpoint between New Haven and Manhattan. In 2019, there were nine Fortune 500 companies located in this city.

Job Market

Contrary to what its median household income may suggest, Connecticut’s job market is not on the rise. With an unemployment rate of 6,1%, the Constitution State ranks #26 among all fifty states (Nebraska is #1 with a 3,0% rate). The economy of the state employs over 1,7 million people. Here are the 5 top hiring companies in Connecticut:

  • Hartford Healthcare;
  • Yale-New Haven Health System;
  • Cigna Corporation;
  • UnitedHealth Group;
  • Lockheed Martin Corporation.

Connecticut’s official state website features a job search engine that is quite helpful and can be found here.

Economy

Connecticut’s venture capital is $25.8/$1,000 GDP, which is significantly higher than the national average of $6.77. However, the state ranks #30 among all states, mainly because of its low job growth, which is below the United States average. Here are the top industries in Connecticut:

  • Advanced manufacturing;
  • Bioscience;
  • Food services;
  • Construction;
  • Financial services;
  • Insurance;
  • Green technology.

Things to do in Connecticut

If you’re into historic sights and the small-town experience, Connecticut is the perfect place for you. In addition to the breathtaking ocean view in the coastal area of the state, you’ll also get to see mountains, hills, state parks, and historic homes all across Connecticut. Here are some things to do in the Constitution State:

  • Powder Ridge Mountain Park & Resort
    • If you’re into snow sports, you’ll be more than happy with the wintertime in Connecticut. Power Ridge is a popular snow resort that offers a bunch of fun activities.
  • The Glass House
    • This attraction is perfect for architecture enthusiasts. The Glass House was designed in 1949 and had a great impact on the architecture of that time, especially because it features a modern design.
  • Mystic Seaport Museum & Aquarium
    • Mystic, Connecticut was a maritime village that was really important to American history and is a pretty popular destination in the Constitution State.
  • Gillette Castle State Park
    • If you want to take a trip down history lane, this is the perfect place for you. The 24-room castle was designed in the early 20th century and was owned by actor William Gillette (hence the name of the castle).
  • Yale University
    • When we think of Connecticut, one of the first things that come to mind is Yale. The prestigious university has quite a few historic sights and is open for tours (as long as a current Yale student is the tour guide).
  • Cove Island Park
    • Cove Island Park in Stamford, CT is a great place to visit with the entire family. There you’ll find hiking trails, children’s activities, sandy beaches, cycling paths, and kite-flying spaces.
  • Submarine Force Library and Museum
    • If you’re into maritime-related activities, you can’t miss the opportunity to visit the Submarine Force Museum, where you’ll see special exhibits, including the USS Nautilus (the first operational nuclear-powered submarine).
  • The Mark Twain House & Museum

Public Transport

In spite of housing some of the wealthiest residents in the United States, Connecticut is one of the worst states when it comes to transportation, ranking at #37 out of 50. Commute time is pretty high and the road quality in Connecticut is also one of the most precarious of all fifty states. Here are some of the means of transportation you can use in Connecticut:

Transportation Fare
CTtransit 2-hour pass: $1.75 All-day pass: $3.50 Children (age 4 and under): Free
CTfastrak 2-hour pass: $1.75 All-day pass: $3.50 Children (age 4 and under): Free
CTrail – Shore Line East One-way: $3.75
CTrides Fares vary depending on the destination.
9 Town Transit Regular: $1.75 Senior/Disabled: $0.85 Children (Age 4 and under): Free
Greater Bridgeport Transit 90-minute ZipTrip pass: $1.75 All-day ZipTrip pass: $4.00 Senior/Disabled: $0.85
CTrail: New Haven Line (from Grand Central Station, NY to New Haven, CT) Regular: $17.75 – $30 Senior/Disabled/Medicare: $11.75 Children (ages 5-11): $9 – $18
CTrail: Hartford Line (from Hartford, CT to New Haven, CT) One-way ticket: $8 Senior/Disabled: $4 Children (ages 2-12): $1 per child

Crime and Safety

Connecticut is one of the safest places to live in America. Ranking #8 in terms of public safety and #17 for corrections, the Constitution State is among the top ten states with the best crime and corrections systems. According to the data, the crime rate in the state is only 17.18 per 1,000 residents and the number of violent crimes is as low as 2.07 offenses per 1,000 inhabitants — the national average violent crime rate is 394/100k residents, whereas in Connecticut that number is 228/100k residents. The 5 safest cities in Connecticut are:

  • Ridgefield
  • Ledyard
  • Old Saybrook
  • New Canaan
  • Newtown

Acquire a new driver’s license

If you’re moving to Connecticut, one of the first things you need to do is get a new driver’s license in the state or transfer your old one. According to the DMV, new residents in Connecticut have 30 days to transfer their out-of-state license. It’s not exactly a simple process, but we’re here to help you. Here’s what you need to know about acquiring a new driver’s license in Connecticut:

  • Make an appointment at the local DMV and bring the following:
    • Current driver’s license (which may not have been expired for more than 2 years)
    • Application for a Non-Commercial Driver’s Licence (Form R-229)
    • Acceptable identification document (one of the following: birth certificate, US passport, certificate of naturalization, certificate of citizenship, permanent resident card)
    • Application fee of $40
    • License fee of $84
  • You’ll undergo a vision test, so bring your glasses or contact lenses;
  • If your current license has expired for over two years, you’ll need a Learner’s Permit before acquiring a new license in Connecticut;
  • Out-of-state or out-of-country students in Connecticut don’t need a new license;
  • Drivers under 18 must complete an 8-hour Safe Driving Practices class before obtaining a new driver’s license in Connecticut.

You can make an appointment with the State of Connecticut’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) here. The Application for a Non-Commercial Driver’s License Form R-229 can be downloaded here.

Road Safety, Highways, and Routes

The Connecticut Department of Transit has a unit dedicated exclusively to Safety Engineering in order to ensure road safety at all times. On top of developing transportation policies and guidelines, the Safety Engineering unit also implements road safety programs that help prevent fatal or serious crashes in Connecticut. Here are a few of the main highways, roads, and routes in the Constitution State:

Interstate Highways State Routes Special Service Roads State Roads
I-84 Route 2 SSR 401 SR 616
I-91 Route 8 SSR 410 SR 502
I-95 Route 15 SSR 411 SR 664
I-291 Route 32 SSR 431 SR 695
I-384 Route 12 SSR 434 SR 534

Museums

Close-up view of the State Capitol building in Hartford, Connecticut
Built in 1872, the Connecticut State Capitol building houses the House of Representatives, the Connecticut General Assembly, the State Senate, and the office of the Governor of the State of Connecticut

Connecticut is full of historic sights and it has an extensive and important history. Thanks to the wealthy residents that live in this state, some museums feature entirely-donated collections of beautiful art pieces. That is why this state is a great choice for those who love visiting museums and being surrounded by culture. From historic homes to modern art, here are the top 7 museums in Connecticut:

In the end, is moving to Connecticut worth it?

Home to over 3 million people, Connecticut is the third-smallest state in America. Culturally and historically-rich, this state has played an important role in the history of the United States, beginning from its influence on the very first constitution. Because of its importance and privileged location just around the corner from cities such as New York and Boston, the state of Connecticut has always attracted wealthy residents — which has had a direct impact on the costs of living there. With an average house price of almost $300k, Connecticut is one of the most expensive places to live in America, but also one of the safest. If your budget allows for it, moving to Connecticut is a great option for families who want to enjoy the outdoors and for parents who want to ensure that their kids receive a high-quality education.

How to Move to Connecticut

If you’re moving to the Constitution State, we’re here to help you in the process. Here’s everything you need to know on how to move to Connecticut:

  1. Plan ahead
    • No matter where you’re going or what you’re doing, planning ahead is the key to everything. By doing so, you’ll save yourself the money and the trouble! If you need a hand, you can download our moving checklist.
  2. Downsize
  3. Reducing the number of things you will bring along when you move to Connecticut will not only help you stay on budget but also help you find the best movers.
  1. Get moving quotes
    • Moving costs are quite plentiful. If you don’t want to spend more money than necessary while moving to Connecticut, a helpful tip is to get moving quotes from different moving companies.
  2. Book movers
    • Once you’ve searched around and found the perfect moving company for you, it’s time to book cheap movers and get this process started.
  3. Visit your new area
    • Another helpful tip when moving somewhere is to visit the new area ahead of moving there. This way you’ll get to see how’s the travel like and if your movers may encounter any problems when transporting your belongings.
  4. Start packing
    • One of the most time-consuming parts of moving to a new place is packing your things into boxes. If you don’t want to waste time or risk forgetting something important, it’s best if you start packing right away.
  5. Create an Essentials box:
    • If you want to make sure you won’t leave anything behind, create an Essentials box, and store all the things you consider vital.
  6. Say farewells
    • Now that you’re halfway through the process of moving to Connecticut, don’t forget to say farewells to your friends and family.
  7. Get some rest
    • Moving to a new place is incredibly tiresome — both mentally and physically. There’s no shame in taking some time to rest before making the big move!
  8. Enjoy the move
    • You’re starting a new chapter in your life — enjoy it! If you’re moving across the country, this is the perfect opportunity to snap some amazing photos and get to know different places.

Moving services to help you relocate to Connecticut

Moving companies offer a broad range of services and they can help you with pretty much anything you’ll need during the moving process. If you’re moving to Connecticut, here are some of the services you may like to know about:

  • Furniture transportation
  • Residential movers
  • Piano Transportation
    • If you’re a pianist, the first thing you need to know before you move to Connecticut is that not all moving companies transport pianos. Moving a piano requires training, so make sure that your movers are trained for that.
  • Art and Antiques Movers
    • Moving art pieces and antiques to a new place requires special protocols in order to preserve the integrity of your belongings. Some moving companies specialize in moving arts and antiques, so make sure to hire them specifically.
  • Hot Tub Movers
  • Pool Table Movers
    • You’ve made the calculations and noticed that buying a new pool table for your home is more expensive than moving your current one to Connecticut. Make sure to hire a company that specializes in moving pool tables.
  • Office Movers
    • Moving is not necessarily restricted to houses. That is, if you’re relocating to a new office, you can hire a moving company too! Some movers are specialists in office/commercial moving.
  • Long-distance Movers
    • If you’re moving to Connecticut from places like Texas or California, you’ll need a company that works with long-distance moving, given that some companies only work with local moving.
  • Last-minute Movers
    • If for some reason you’ll have to move ahead of schedule, you’ll need to find a last-minute mover. Their services may be slightly pricier, but they’ll get your moving process started immediately.

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    3. We may also use the information you provide in your Quote Request to (i) contact you about your satisfaction with the Site, whether you obtained Relocation Services from any Vendor through the Site, the identity of any such Vendor, and your satisfaction with the Relocation Services provided by such Vendor, and (ii) to send you information and promotional messages about our associated products and services, or the products or services that we offer on this Site or on our other websites.
  2. ANONYMOUS INFORMATION. We use anonymous information to analyze our Site traffic. In addition, we may use anonymous IP addresses to help diagnose problems with our server, to administer our site, or to display the content according to your preferences. Traffic and transaction information may also be shared with business partners and advertisers on an aggregate and anonymous basis.
  3. USE OF COOKIES. Promotions or advertisements displayed on our site may contain cookies. We do not have access to or control over information collected by outside advertisers on our site.
  4. DISCLOSURE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION. We may disclose any information we have for you if required to do so by law or in the good-faith belief that such action is necessary to (1) conform to the edicts of the law or comply with legal process served on us, (2) protect and defend our rights or property or the users of the Site, or (3) act under exigent circumstances to protect the safety of the public or users of the Site.
  5. SALE OF INFORMATION. In order to accommodate changes in our business, we may sell or buy portions of the Site or our company, including the information collected through this Site. If Company or substantially all of its assets are acquired by a third party, user information will be one of the assets transferred to the acquirer.

4. SECURITY

The Site has security measures in place to prevent the loss, misuse, and alteration of the information that we obtain from you, but we make no assurances about our ability to prevent any such loss to you or to any third party arising out of any such loss, misuse, or alteration.

5. WEBSITE AREAS BEYOND COMPANY’S CONTROL

5.1. THIRD PARTY WEBSITES
From time-to-time, the Site may contain links to other websites. If you choose to visit those websites, it is important to understand our privacy practices and terms of use do not extend to those sites. It is your responsibility to review the privacy policies at those websites to confirm that you understand and agree with their practices.

6. CONTACT INFORMATION AND POLICY UPDATES

6.1. CONTACTING US
If you have any questions about this Policy or our practices related to this Site, please feel free to contact us at info@mymovingestimates.com.

6.2. UPDATES AND CHANGES
We reserve the right, at any time, to add to, change, update, or modify this Policy to reflect changes in our Privacy Policy. We shall post any such changes on the Site in a conspicuous area. You may then choose whether you wish to accept said policy changes or discontinue using the Site. Any such change, update, or modification will be effective 30 days after posting on the Site. It is your responsibility to review this Policy from time to time to ensure that you continue to agree with all of its terms.

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Do Not Sell My Info

Mymovingestimates.com will connect you with movers in our network who can service your move. Mymovingestimates.com receives compensation from the movers for this service. By law this is considered “selling of information”. The purpose of our business is to connect you with 3-d party service providers. If you would like to proceed, please, click on “I understand, let’s proceed”. Alternatively, please, exit the website now. For more information, please see our Terms and Privicy.

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